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Chicago Fire

05 May 11:55 am

Check out different angles and slow mo versions of Mike Magee & Juan Luis Anangono's first half goals from Saturday's match vs. Real Salt Lake: 

03 May 11:42 pm

Frank Yallop, Chicago Fire Head Coach and Director of Soccer

On if the Fire were the better team tonight

“No, cause they weren’t. The first half was good, the second half we were totally out played. Very naïve from us. At some point you have to figure it out on the field. I can’t do much from where I am at except make changes in certain things, the lineup, and get other players in, but you got to stand up and be counted.”

On how frustrated he feels

“I feel terrible because I thought tactically we had it figured out. We did great in the first half, but the game is 90 minutes. You got to punish them with another goal, but I said at half time ‘they are going to come at you because they’re good.’ I don’t think we really wanted to win that game because we didn’t show it. If we wanted to, we would have put our head through the ball, and be good at that stuff. We had a total collapse in a game we should have won.”

On if the team broke down from Real Salt Lake’s pressure

“They’re a good side. They could have scored a couple first half [goals].The whole game is in ebbs and flows, we had some chances, took them, they had a couple, and Sean made two great saves. We’ve played eight games, we’ve not won yet. We got to go to a tough place next game, and we got to get a result.”

On keeping morale high without getting wins

“We will find out next week. We’ve not had that happen to us collapsing like that in the second half. Take nothing away from them but we should see that game out, 2-1, even 2-2, but not 3-2. I got to figure out who is going to be punching and fighting the whole season, the whole 90 minutes.”

On if there will be some changes for next week

“It’s a bit early for that, but I would think so.”

On if there was too much respect for Real Salt Lake

“They play a certain style of game. It’s a possession game. We just kept going backwards and not stepping into people. We tended to drop and have low pressure, but that doesn’t mean no pressure. You still got to try to win the ball back and then break. I don’t want to be that deep, but we ended up that deep. You got to see that game through. We’ve got to be man enough to see that game through, and we didn’t.”

On positives from that performance

“We scored two goals. I guess that’s a positive. When you lose it’s sickening. It’s very difficult to take. First half, Sean made some good saves and we played pretty well. Then a crazy 15-20 minute spell, we give the game to them, which is really disappointing.”

Jeff Larentowicz, Chicago Fire midfielder and captain

On what changed from the first half to the second half:

“We stopped doing things in the second half that we did well in the first – we conceded ground, allowed them to play in our end, didn’t connect passes once we had it, and if you do that against a good team they are going to beat you.”

On how RSL was able to do that:

“They crowd the ball, they get a lot of numbers, and they’re good at finding ways to keep possession.  They make you work defensively, so once you get it you’re tired and they wear you down.  I don’t think it was a conscious thing where we said ‘alright let’s hunker down,’ we just have to defend and defend properly.”

On how to move forward:

“This is a mental test for us.  All the positives we’ve been putting on things, we can’t do it any longer.  It’s been weeks and tonight it’s a loss, it’s not a game where can say we played a complete game and didn’t get the points, we didn’t.  We have to look at the mistakes we made and move on. Like I said, it’s a mental challenge; we can’t go in the negative direction.  The guys have to keep a positive attitude, guys have to honestly assess what they are doing personally to a man, go home and figure out how they are going to work harder and push themselves to have a positive attitude and push on. At this point it’s difficult – you can go one of two directions and we have to push forward and have to expect that we can learn from our mistakes and move on.”

Sean Johnson, Chicago Fire goalkeeper

On the result:

“I think it’s obvious that it doesn’t feel great, after we were up 2-0 and losing at home.  I can’t really describe the emotions right now; it’s a difficult one to swallow at home, being up.  We can’t make excuses for it though.  We were not good enough.”

On the shift in the game:

“We have to search for answers.  I don’t know what happened, we were up 2-0 on cruise control, the game was in our hands and they scored one, they scored two, get the momentum and before you know it they won the game.”

On what’s next for the team:

“This was definitely a test for us.  We’ve got to look at ourselves, there’s no one for us to blame.  We’ve got to look at ourselves in the locker room and come up with a solution.  We keep digging a hole for ourselves, there’s no reason at this point in the season we should be where we are - we should be close to the top of the table.  We’ve had games in hand; off the top of my head we’ve had four games now that I feel like we should have gotten a win.  Scratch the ties, we’ve taken a step back now with the loss.  We’ve got to get back to training.  We can’t get down; we can’t let something like this affect the mood of the team.  We have to keep chugging along; we have a handful of games left, so we have to dig in.”

On the difficulty of staying positive during the winless streak:

“This is our job, professionally, game in and game out we have to have the same attitude and find a way to win games, plain and simple.  We’ve been through everything tactically, physically and mentally I think now we have to find what it takes to win these games.”

On the coach’s reaction to the loss:

“Obviously we’re not happy with ourselves and the coaching staff is obviously disappointed with the result – there’s really not much more to say.  There’s disappointment all the way around.”

01 May 3:26 pm

Dan Haiek and Matt Doyle talk all things Harry Shipp and break down his rookie season.

01 May 9:09 am

It's Throwback Thursday on the Social Media which lines up for an interesting moment in Fire History that occured this week in 2001.

Coming up on the end of his career, legendary U.S. international Eric Wynalda was acquired by the Fire in a trade with New England that sent John Wolyniec and a 2002 SuperDraft pick to the Revolution on May 3 of that year. 

At the time, Wynalda was the all-time leading goal scorer for the U.S. Men's National Team (34 goals) but injuries and national team commitments had kept him from really making an impact for his previous MLS clubs in San Jose, Miami and New England.

Bolstering a Fire attack which already featured the likes of Ante Razov, Hristo Stoitchkov, Piotr Nowak and DaMarcus Beasley, Wynalda joined the team a month into the campaign and took just two days to score his first goal for the club in a 2-0 win over Tampa Bay on May 5. That goal was the first of 10 he scored in less than a full season with the Fire (the first time he'd done it since the inaugural MLS campaign in 1996). He also added two more in the Open Cup and a single marker in the MLS Cup playoffs.

That would be his only season with the Fire and curtain call in MLS but his double-digit goal campaign makes him one of just seven Chicago Fire players to achieve the feat. (Can you name the others? Answer below the photo...)

Though he played only one season for the Fire, Wynalda went into the National Soccer Hall of Fame as a Fire player in 2004, joining former U.S. teammates Paul Caligiuri and Mike Windischmann as well as Women's National Team legend Michelle Akers in that year's induction class.  

ANSWER: All-Time Chicago Fire double digit goal scorers: Ante Razov (1998-2000, 2002-2003), Damani Ralph (2003-2004), Eric Wynalda (2001), Josh Wolff (1999), Dema Kovalenko (2000), Dominic Oduro (2011), Mike Magee (2013)

01 May 8:47 am

After yet another draw against the Revs last time out, the Fire head into May without a win. The first of four grueling matches this month is against Real Salt Lake at Toyota Park on Saturday evening (7:30pm CT on My50/TWCSC). Both teams enter this game with sour tastes in their mouths after the way their last matches ended and I expect it to be a frantic first 20 minutes or so. Here are some things to look out for from a tactical perspective.

Replacing Quincy – how will coach Yallop adjust to the loss of the team’s top scorer?

Perhaps the most important outcome of the match against New England last time out was the red card and one game suspension for Qunicy Amarikwa, the team’s top goal scorer and most consistent attacking threat this season. Replacing Amarikwa is no easy task, especially because his partnership with Mike Magee was just starting to bloom, but the Fire coaching staff does have plenty of options.

The most obvious and like for like switch would be for Juan Luis Anangono and act as the target striker with Magee playing behind him. Anangono has come off the bench on a consistent basis this season and will be looking to avenge his injury time penalty miss against New England.

A more likely scenario however would be for either Victor Pineda or Benji Joya to start in place of Amarikwa. Both players are comfortable playing in the forward roles and Joya especially would relish a chance to start in his more natural position instead of a wide one where he began the season.

Playing with either Joya or Pineda up front would also allow the Fire to continue to play a target-less striker formation, something that has worked to date this season. That being said, Frank Yallop could also decide to start Joya or Pineda in one of the wide positions in an attempt to combat RSL’s midfield diamond, as I will explain below.

Don’t be too distracted by the obvious – Plata and Saborio are the clear danger men but Luke Mulholland makes RSL tick

Many will argue RSL’s unbeaten start to the season is down to players like Joao Plata, Alvaro Saborio or Javier Morales making the difference but the player who has had possibility the biggest impact this season is Englishman Luke Mulholland.

Mulholland plays on the outside of RSL’s compact midfield diamond, with Ned Grabavoy operating on the other side. In attack, Mulholland can provide balls into the area from a wide position but he also excels at making late runs into the box where he often finds space due to defenders concentrating on RSL’s more known attacking threats.

Defensively, Mulholland provides cover for his full back and does not get caught up the field often in transition. The Englishmen has chipped in with two goals and one assist in four starts this season and acts as the youthful spark in a midfield containing veterans such as Kyle Beckerman and Javier Morales.

Mulholland is also very versatile, with he and Grabavoy able to operate comfortably on either side of the diamond. To combat this, I could see the Fire drafting Matt Watson or Logan Pause in to pack the midfield, especially against RSL’s narrow formation. Watson or Pause could play alongside anchor Jeff Larentowicz or a bit higher up, perhaps alongside Harry Shipp or Alex in a 4-1-4-1 formation.

In last week’s match against Vancouver, RSL overran the Whitecaps midfield for much of the first half. Putting an extra body in the middle on Saturday night would ensure the same thing doesn’t happen to the Men in Red.

Exposing RSL on the flanks – proving an attacking threat from both wings

Since the return of Patrick Nyarko to the starting eleven, the Ghanaian has been a one-man wrecking crew down the right hand side for the Fire. Nyarko has also combined well with right back Lovel Palmer in attack – something we saw work in the Fire’s favor against New England two weeks ago.

Due to RSL’s narrow formation, they can be exploited on the wings, where the full backs are sometimes left isolated. Nyarko and Palmer should thrive against this type of formation but for the Fire to take full advantage, the team needs to also have a consistent attacking threat from the left.

As mentioned in previous previews, left back Greg Cochrane has excelled in the absence of Gonzalo Segares and is always looking to get forward to support the attack.

In recent matches, Harry Shipp has drifted inside from his wide left position to great effect but against RSL, whoever occupies the wide left position must try to take advantage of their narrow midfield by attacking from wide. With the center of the park sure to be busy, if the Fire focus their attack in the wide areas, it could result in the team picking up its first win of the season.

Prediction: It was a long time coming, but the Fire finally pick up three points – 2-1 Fire with goals from Mike Magee and Patrick Nyarko.

Stephen Piggott is a contributor to Chicago-Fire.com. Follow him on Twitter @Irish_Steve.

WATCH: Kevin and Jeff preview Saturday's game vs. RSL

30 April 3:10 pm

Michael Cox is a writer and the man behind Zonal Marking, the tactics nerd utopia of soccer content. For years, ZM’s straight-to-the-point style has illuminated the tactical sub-matter of important matches and identified the trends dictating soccer set-ups around the world.

We went back and forth on the 4-1-4-1 formation, national trends, and MLS’s best tactical role model.

Ben Schuman-Stoler: The Fire have experimented this year with a 4-1-4-1 formation, which has morphed in certain times into the more familiar 4-4-2, 4-3-3, 4-5-1, and 4-2-3-1 set ups. Can you say a little bit about the 4-1-4-1 in general? What are its weaknesses and strengths? Are there any teams in recent memory you can recall employing it consistently?

Michael Cox: The 4-1-4-1 isn't particularly fashionable, but part of this is because managers will always call it a 4-3-3 - a 4-3-3 is basically a 4-1-4-1 when it's without the ball. But 4-3-3 sounds much more exciting, so you'll rarely get a 4-1-4-1 hailed as a brilliant system.

The major problem is the fact the lone striker can become isolated, although the opportunity to get midfield runners forward means this shouldn't be too much of a problem if he can drop deep, link play and hold up the ball. That said, the importance of the midfield runners getting forward means the holding player has a huge responsibility without the ball, and can often become overrun at defensive transitions, particularly if the opposition get two players either side of him - he doesn't have the comfort of a partner.

BSS: Is there also anything different a back four (in particular the outside backs) have to keep in mind in a 4-1-4-1 compared to a 4-4-2 or 4-2-3-1?

MC: I think the major difference is that the full-backs have to be able to track the opposition’s winger inside. If you're in a 4-2-3-1 and you're dealing with an opposition 4-2-3-1, your two holding midfielders can deal with (a) the opposition number ten and (b) a David Silva-like character drifting inside. With the 4-1-4-1 he'll become overloaded, so your full-backs have more responsibility to move inside and stop him.

BSS: What are your thoughts regarding national-specific or league-specific tactics? Do they ever develop naturally and therefore uniquely for that country/league? Could the ideas developing in the MLS affect the U.S. National Team, and ever add to their chances of international success? In what way has MLS changed or not changed your understanding or appreciation of American soccer and tactics therein?

MC: This is an interesting question. I think it's generally top-down, to be honest - the national side gets success and influences lots of the domestic sides. The best example is Chile - Bielsa went there before the last World Cup, brought in 3-3-1-3 and heavy pressing, and that trickled down to the domestic sides, particularly Universidad de Chile. Now they all play that way, Chile have an identity, and Uni's old coach Sampoali is now the Chile manager, picking lots of his old players for the national side while simultaneously continuing with the Bielsa approach. I gather something similar has happened in Ghana with 4-2-3-1 and counter-attacking play. Really, I think the best way for the USA to arrive at something similar is for Jurgen Klinsmann to come up with something interesting, which then trickles down. It would be tough for him to accommodate MLS-specific tactics on the world stage against more 'advanced' European approaches.

BSS: I'm curious about the ways in which tactical ideas travel across countries. Recently Manchester City's American project nabbed Jason Kreis from Salt Lake City. He's currently doing 6 months at the Etihad to learn and bring their ideas to the States. What do you think MLS's opportunity is with regards to "market research"? How are tactical ideas developed on their own in certain leagues vs. affected by worldwide trends or coaching lineage?

MC: Hmm, that's such a tough question, you could probably write a whole book about it, to be honest. I think the main thing to consider here is that ideas now travel faster than ever before because of the internet etc, and also because coaches and players travel to different countries more than ever before. The globalization of football in the past 15 years or so means theoretically, there should be less boundaries in this respect.

To me it seems logical for an MLS club to look to the Premier League. American soccer seems quite physical and in a certain sense quite basic tactically, and of the major European leagues the Premier League is probably quite a good fit.

29 April 8:41 am

Now into it's second season, the MLS and USL PRO partnership is going well with 11 MLS sides currently affiliated with lower league teams, allowing younger players or those at the ends of MLS benches the ability to gain more playing time in meaningful matches at the USL level.

From the Fire end, we've seen the other side of the USL PRO partnership this past week, as the club's Reserve side played two matches against the Rochester Rhinos and Charlotte Eagles with the games counting in both the MLS Reserve Standings as well as the USL PRO table. With MLS mandating that all clubs either need to have an affiliation or  begin a separate team in the USL PRO division by 2015, the Fire and seven other MLS sides will surely have this in the forefront this year.

A look at the current MLS/USL PRO affiliations:

USL PRO Club MLS Club
Arizona United SC -
Charleston Battery Vancouver Whitecaps
Charlotte Eagles -
Dayton Dutch Lions Columbus Crew
Harrisburg City Islanders Philadelphia Union
LA Galaxy II LA Galaxy
Oklahoma City Energy Sporting KC
Orange County Blues -
Orlando City SC Sporting KC**
Pittsburgh Riverhounds Houston Dynamo
Richmond Kickers D.C. United
Rochester Rhinos New England Revolution
Sacramento Republic Portland Timbers & San Jose Earthquakes
Wilmington Hammerheads Toronto FC

**Sporting KC will have main affiliation with Oklahoma City beginning next season when Orlando City joins MLS

Last month Fire Technical Director Brian Bliss spoke to reporters about the headway the club has made on finding a USL PRO affiliate and specifically mentioned that the club held talks with the owners of Arizona United SC as well as a group in Milwaukee looking to launch a new USL PRO club in the near future and other possible cities in the Midwest.

The Colorado Switchbacks and Tulsa Roughnecks, two other clubs that could fit that "Midwest" mold, are already set to begin play in USL PRO next season while the USL Premier Development League's Michigan Bucks are also making noise about a move up to the professional level.

But what other Midwest cities could make sense for a Chicago Fire affiliation? Where does a soccer hotbed like St. Louis fall in all of this? What about Grand Rapids, Cleveland, Cincinnati or even Des Moines, Iowa?

Where would you most like to see a Fire USL PRO affiliation heading into the 2015 season? Tell us below: 

28 April 9:17 am

Racist chants and actions are nothing new in the world of soccer.

And while different campaigns and the simple spectre of time have helped a great deal in stampinig out racism in the game, shameful incidents do still occur. 

See Barcelona's game this weekend at Villareal. Trailing 2-1 in the 76th minute, defender Dani Alves was set to take a corner kick when a banana was thrown just in front of him. Rather than ignore the act, Alves picked up the banana, ate a piece and took the corner kick... See below:

Barcelona went on to win the match 3-2, with the tying tally coming off an Alves cross that deflected for a Villareal own goal. 

Remembering last summer when Ghanaian international Kevin Prince-Boateng faced down racist chants by walking off the field in a friendly for AC Milan, do you think Alves' reponse to racism was more effective?

24 April 1:08 pm

The beginning road for the 101st edition of the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup was set Thursday with the U.S. Soccer Federation releasing the new tournament format, first round and potential second round pairings. 

Of note, the 2014 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup will feature the largest-ever tournament field with 80 teams participating, smashing the previous record of 68 teams set last year. Forty-two of the 80 participating teams are amateur sides, breaking the previous record of 34 (also set in 2013). Also of note, all professional teams at Division I, II and III levels are participating in the competition for the third straight year. 

The Chicago Fire will join the Open Cup party in the tournament's fourth round, set to be played June 10-18. In case you need a local Open Cup fix, two Illinois-based amateur sides are in the tournament as RWB Adria returns along with Schwaben AC.

Adria visits NPSL side Detroit City FC in a first round match up on Wednesday, May 7 at Stevenson High School in Livonia, Mich., while Schwaben will enter play in the tournament's second round when they host USL PRO side Dayton Dutch Lions on Wednesday, May 14 at 4:00pm CT at Schwaben Athletic Club in Buffalo Grove, Ill. 

Check out the full tournament format and first and second round pairings with U.S. Soccer's official release here. For more in depth coverage on the 101st edition of the Open Cup, visit www.thecup.us and follow @USOpenCup on Twitter!

24 April 7:31 am

Hey everyone. I'm still a little sour about my sending off at the weekend but I'm not going to let that get in the way of my latest #BeatQuincy MLS Fantasy Challenge video.

In today's show, I award last week's winner, "Smoke + Mirrors", show off the top prize for the month of March (I'm looking at you Zusi n Me Wynne'n) and then to keep things interesting, take a different direction with the show...

So... I destroyed Jeff Crandall in the first #QuincyTime challenge but let's make it more interesting... Tweet your ideas for the next challenge to me @QuincyAmarikwa using #QuincyTime and we'll sort out the best ones for future episodes!

You can still join the #BeatQuincy MLS Fantasy League by clicking here and using League Code: 17933-3213